Goat Discovery Day

Strengthen your goat confidence and know-how. If you are an experienced “goat person” or you hope to be, this event is for you! A full day of workshops, demos with live goats, vendors, and networking. Presented by Emerald Dairy Goat Association and Oregon State University Extension Services.

Schedule
8:00 – 9:00 am: Check-in. Hot drinks and sweet treats available.
9:00 – 9:15 am: Welcome
9:15 – 9:20 am: Transition to First Session
9:20 – 10:50 am: Session 1 options:
Getting into Packing with Goats, Wayne Sherrard
Common Goat Diseases and How to Manage Them, Dr. Charles Estill, OSU Extension
Goat Herbalism, Kat Drovdahl
11:00 am – 12:30 pm: Session 2 options:
Milking and Milk Handling Procedures, Jenifer Cruickshank OSU Extension
FAMACHA Training, Dr. Charles Estill, OSU Extension
Hay and Forage Nutrition, Ian McGregor OSU Extension
12:30 – 1:45 pm: Lunch Break (see lunch details after Session Descriptions)
1:45 – 2:45 pm: Session 3 options:
Pros & Cons of Milk Machines, Cristen Sullivan Simple Pulse
Introductory Goat Genomics, Jenifer Cruickshank OSU Extension
The Goat’s Got Juice, Kat Drovdahl
2:45 – 3:00 pm: Break. Goat cheese and crackers provided by EDGA
3:00 – 4:00 pm: Session 4 options:
Preparation for Milk Testing, Carla Polson
Goat Conformation, Melanie Ferguson, Royal Cedars and HIdden Meadows Farm
Marketing Goats and Goat Products, Melissa Fery OSU Extension
Session Descriptions
Goat Herbalism
Katherine Drovdahl MH CR CA CEIT DipHIr QTP

Goat Herbalism is a great class for those that would like to learn more about working with herbs with their goats from a Master of Herbology and herb company owner that raises goats and other farm animals and has been teaching others how to do the same for over a decade.

The Goat’s Got Juice
Katherine Drovdahl MH CR CA CEIT DipHIr QTP teaches you several ways to administer herbs to your favorite caprines!

FAMACHA Training
[Limited to 20 participants, cost $15 for FAMACHA card kit]

Dr. Charles Estill, Oregon State University

FAMACHA is a diagnostic tool to help you identify parasite infection in small ruminants, such as sheep and goats. The tool is a chart that matches eyelid color to anemia levels, an indicator of parasite infection. This type of diagnosis allows farmers to target treatment only to infected animals, which in some systems has reduced use of deworming agents by 90 percent. Not only do farmers save money, they significantly reduce the likelihood of causing parasites to become resistant to dewormers. FAMACHA training is only available through certified veterinarians.

Common Goat Diseases and How to Manage Them
Dr. Charles Estill, Oregon State University

Learn about the common diseases that affect goats in the Pacific Northwest and how to prevent and treat diseases to help keep your goat herd healthy.

Hay and Forage Nutrition
Ian McGregor, OSU Extension Service Livestock Program

This session will focus on understanding how nutrient content of forages is affected by various environmental, physiological, and cultural circumstances. You will walk away with an improved ability to judge hay or pasture forages for their nutrient content, and will ultimately end up with a more sophisticated nutrient management style for your goat business.

Preparation for Milk Testing
Carla Polson

This session will cover what you need to know to prepare for your first milk test as a herd owner or a new milk tester. We will cover the process, taking samples and packing for the lab and much more.

Pros and Cons of Milk Machines
Cristen Sullivan, Simple Pulse

This session will explore the pros and cons of using milk machines as well as address commonly asked milking questions.

Getting into Packing with Goats
Wayne Sherrard, North American Pack Goat Association

This presentation is for the beginner interested in partnering with pack goats for hunting and wilderness exploration. Pack goats are gaining popularity in western states including Oregon. Wayne will be discussing specifics about breeds and selecting goats with packing potential. There will also be a saddling demonstration, equipment show-and-tell and trail etiquette dos and don’ts.

Marketing Goats and Goat Products
Melissa Fery, OSU Extension Service Small Farms Program

Are you interested in selling live goats, meat, and/or milk from goats? If your answer is yes, plan to attend this session where we’ll talk about direct marketing strategies and rules and regulations to keep in mind.

Milking and Milk Handling
Jenifer Cruickshank, OSU Extension Service

Learn about the physiology of milk letdown, udder preparation and cleanliness, proper milking equipment use, sanitary milk handling procedures, and pasteurization options.

Introductory Goat Genomics
Jenifer Cruickshank, OSU Extension Service

Review basic genetics and learn about what genomics is, how genomic information is generated and being used, and how it might ultimately be useful in making goat breeding decisions.

Goat Conformation
Melanie Ferguson, Royal Cedars and Hidden Meadows Farm

Conformation is how well a goat conforms to the ideal according to breed. This session is for goat enthusiasts who may want to show goats and those interested in learning about conformation and how the concepts apply to doe selection and herd management.

Lunch Information
You are welcome to bring your own lunch to the event, go out for lunch, or add on a catered lunch option for $11. There are two options for lunch, either a sandwich or a salad – both come with a dark chocolate brownie for dessert and beverage choices of water, iced tea & mango spritzer:

TTABS Sandwich with turkey, avocado, bacon, swiss & tomato with a green goddess aioli between Creswell Bakery multi grain sourdough.
Kitchen Sink Salad includes organic greens, cucumbers, carrots, tomatoes, bell peppers, nuts, pickled beets, feta & whatever else the chef finds. Served with bread. Balsamic vinaigrette & ranch optional on side.

Get Yer Goat-Goat Education Day

“Get Yer Goat” is a popular is a day of education for both novice and experienced goat owners. Both beginner and an advanced workshops tracks will be offered throughout the day. This year classes include: Nutrition and Feed, Dairy Goat Confirmation, Midwifery, Milking Procedures, Housing, Holistic Goat Care, Cheesemaking, Soap Making, Felted Soap. Each class is 1.5 hours. Choose two classes for the morning blocks, and two for the afternoon.
A taco salad lunch is included with the event fee (both vegetarian and meat options).
Active 4-H members may ask about an additional discount option. This event is a collaborative effort between OSU Extension Small Farms and the Rogue Valley Dairy Goat Association.

Office Hours at the Grange

Head to the Multnomah Grange for free one-on-one assistance from Jeremy Baker, Senior Conservation Planner. The Multnomah Grange is located at 30639 SE Bluff Road in Gresham. Bring your questions and explore strategies and solutions around:

Erosion prevention
Forestry
Natural areas
Livestock and grazing
Cropping
Irrigation

Nutraceuticals 2019

The New Phase of Supplements in Nutraceuticals & Natural Medicines; Nutraceuticals invites all the participants from all over the world to attend 15th international Congress on Advances in Natural Medicines, Nutraceuticals & Neurocognition on” during July 08-09, 2019 at Berlin, Germany which includes prompt Keynote presentations, Oral talks (Speaker forum and Young research forum), Poster presentations, Workshops and Exhibitions.

Controversial New Factory Farm Proposed for Oregon – Comment by Nov. 4

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A dairy CAFO (confined animal feeding operation).

Oregon is a family farm state, and the vast majority of farms in Oregon are small or mid-sized. But, increasingly, out-of-state industrial factory farms are taking advantage of Oregon’s surprisingly lax oversight of these kinds of operations and are moving in.

The newest proposal is ‘Lost Valley Ranch’, a 30,000 head mega-dairy planned in north central Oregon near Boardman, in an area already faced with persistent groundwater pollution, livestock related air quality issues and home to the nation’s largest industrial dairy. Despite calling itself a ‘ranch’, Lost Valley is seeking a state Confined Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) permit to house thousands of dairy cows in long buildings and store the 187 million gallons per year of manure waste these cows produce in huge lagoons.

Make your voice heard on the water pollution permit for the Lost Valley Ranch mega-CAFO before 5pm, November 4!

In August, a coalition of small farm advocates, including Friends of Family Farmers, public health organizations like Physicians for Social Responsibility, and several environmental and animal welfare organizations, submitted comments in opposition to the Lost Valley Ranch proposal. Over 2300 members of the public did as well.

In September, Oregon’s Environmental Justice Task Force requested that the comment period for the CAFO water quality permit for Lost Valley Ranch be re-opened to allow for more outreach to potentially impacted communities.

In response, the Oregon Departments of Agriculture (ODA) and Environmental Quality (DEQ) re-opened the comment period, allowing the public to weigh in on the proposal until 5pm Friday, November 4. This gives the public one last chance to make their voices heard.

Click here to email comments to Wym Matthews, the CAFO Program Director for the Oregon Department of Agriculture, and Governor Kate Brown.

The Oregon Pasture Network is Officially Launched!

Farmers and consumers alike haveoregon pasture-smaller shown a growing interest in humane, environmentally friendly meat, egg and dairy products. Consumers want to buy them and farmers want to produce them. With growing concerns about factory farming practices and its health and environmental impacts, pasture-raised animal husbandry holds a lot of appeal. Friends of Family Farmers (FoFF) aims to support these burgeoning interests and connections through their newly-launched initiative: the Oregon Pasture Network (OPN).

OPN Farmer, Jon Bansen, and family

This statewide network will support the growth of pasture-based farming in Oregon. The OPN is a community of farmers, ranchers, food business owners and consumers who share similar values around the way food should be produced. They believe that raising animals on pasture, rather than in confinement, is the most sustainable, humane way to produce animal products.   When asked why he feels the network is important, Jon Bansen, member of OPN’s Farmer Advisory Committee and Organic Valley Co-op producer, said simply “Pasturing is important to our planet. I believe it is the one farming practice that will aid in our fight against global warming through carbon sequestration.”

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Jon Carter, OPN Farmer, of Jo Le Farms

The OPN will help these committed farmers by connecting them to each other for networking and support, connecting them to existing resources and expert assistance, and by promoting them to consumers. One exciting way that FoFF intends to do this is by creating Oregon’s first-ever, statewide pastured producers’ directory so that consumers and food business owners can find the sort of meat, eggs and dairy they are seeking.

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Gus and Margot Liszka, OPN Farmers, of Naked Acres

The Oregon Pasture Network is the newest iteration of FoFF’s popular “Pro Pasture” campaign, launched in 2013, which centered on encouraging farm-direct purchasing and farm-to-table restaurant connections to support pasture-based livestock producers. The OPN will provide new and improved support to Oregon’s dedicated pasture-based livestock producers through membership-based activities, educational opportunities, networking and market promotion. More information is available on the OPN webpage or by calling 503-581-7124, or emailing OPN @ friendsoffamilyfarmers.org.